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err0r

Member Since 25 Feb 2004
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Microsoft slips four more features into the Fall Creators Update with Build 16251

28 July 2017 - 01:08 AM

Microsoft isn’t quite finished developing Windows 10’s Fall Creators Update after all: Four new features were added as part of Windows 10 Insider Build 16251, including new Cortana capabilities and more communication between Windows and your phone.

If there’s a theme to the new build, it’s following up on promises that Microsoft made earlier. At its Build developer conference, Microsoft promised that phones and Windows would begin to communicate with one another, so tasks begun on the phone could be completed on the desktop. Voice commands to shut down and reboot your PC have also been enabled via Cortana—who now has greater freedom to provide answers without launching a browser. Finally, if you do need to reboot your PC, you can program your PC to skip the authentication process.

Why this matters: Microsoft pledged to make the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update a tool for connectivity as much as creativity, with several key features that are slowly rolling out to Insiders. (Several, such as Timeline, we have yet to see, however.) Personally, I like Cortana’s new capabilities more than anything else, though the phone-to-PC connectivity is a welcome foundation for future improvements.

Cortana’s pane in the side

One of Cortana’s minor annoyances is that when she can’t display the answer as a card or a short reply, she’ll automatically launch an Edge webpage. To me, this always felt like giving up. Now, Cortana will slide out an additional pane with, say, a weather forecast. If there is no card available, she’ll show the result with a little arrow next to it to launch a webpage.
windows 10 cortana
Microsoft

Cortana now slides out a preview pane.

Note that the pane looks like a webpage, with the traditional Bing navigation elements along the top of the pane. The only controversy here is that Cortana won’t launch a webpage any more without your input. If this annoys you, incidentally, you can leave feedback for Microsoft using the in-Cortana feedback tool.

Now everyone can tell Cortana to shut up down

In Insider Build 14986, Microsoft included the capability to turn off your PC orally with  a Cortana command. Well, apparently. With Build 16251, Microsoft said it “fully enabled” it. Now, you can lock, sign out, shut down, or turn off your PC. To prevent mischievous coworkers, friends, or YouTube videos from messing with you, some of the voice commands require an additional oral confirmation.

Pick up where you left off... on your Android phone

For years, Microsoft’s vision of the future was that your phone was your PC. Now, with Windows Phones essentially dead, that vision has evolved to your phone mirroring your PC. While Word and other Office apps can be found on your PC as well as your phone, however, your web browsers haven’t talked to one another. Now they do.
windows 10 cortana continue later

Sharing a Web page allows you to pop up the Web page on your PC, or save it for later.

In the new build, you can take your Android phones—yes, Android—open a webpage, then share the page to your PC using the native Share button. It’s not automatic, probably because Android’s Chrome browser doesn’t natively talk to Edge. You’ll have a choice: Either “continue later,” and the webpage will be stored within the Action Center, or “continue now,” which will automatically open up the webpage within Edge.

Note that the existing Creators Update allows your Android phone to alert your PC if the phone has low battery, or respond to messages. That capability requires Cortana to be running on both phones. With the new build, you don’t need Cortana, but Microsoft will ask you to install a “Microsoft Apps” for Android app that bridges the two devices.

 

An “improved” boot process eliminates the login

To its credit, Windows continually tries to shave off seconds from your boot time, even as it occasionally forces a reboot to apply patches. By way of apology, Microsoft hasn’t just eliminated the login process from updates, but also given you the option to do so on a normal power shutdown via the Start menu.

 

Read full article @ http://www.pcworld.c...e-features.html


Ircwx Networks Connection Information

15 July 2017 - 03:28 PM

Buzzen

Connection Address: irc.buzzen.net or 167.114.203.97 or 167.114.203.102

Port: 7778

http://www.buzzen.com

 

Essential Chat Network

Connection Address: 167.114.203.98 or 167.114.203.103

Port: 7778

http://www.ecnchat.com

 

WX

Connection Address: 167.114.203.99

Port: 7778

http://www.ircwx.com

 

Sparkpea

Connection Address: 167.114.203.107 or 167.114.203.109

Port: 7778

http://www.sparkpea.net

 

 


New Sparkpea Connection Information

15 July 2017 - 03:10 PM

Connection IP: 167.114.203.107 or 167.114.203.109

Port: 7778

 

Used to connect to the new sparkpea chat network using IRC client


Facebook is rolling out its ‘Find Wi-Fi’ feature worldwide

30 June 2017 - 11:31 PM

Facebook is expanding one of its newer features designed to help mobile users find accessible Wi-Fi networks. The company had begun testing a “Find Wi-Fi” option last year on mobile, which highlighted free, public Wi-Fi networks nearby. At the time, the option was only available on iOS in select countries, as something of a test. Today, Facebook announced users worldwide on both iOS and Android devices will soon gain access to “Find Wi-Fi.”

The company explains the addition is useful for those times when you’re traveling, but especially so when you’re in an area where cellular data is “scarce,” it says.

In developed markets like the U.S., that could mean more remote, rural locations, but in emerging markets, it’s an even more powerful tool as users often have limited data plans, and spotty cellular coverage in general.

The feature, like other new additions to Facebook’s portal, is found under the “More” tab in the Facebook mobile app. Once you locate the “Find Wi-Fi” tab, Facebook notes you may need to turn it on. Afterwards, Facebook will display a map showing the closest hotspots, as well as details about the businesses that provide them.

Read full article @ https://techcrunch.c...ture-worldwide/

Windows 10 will try to combat ransomware by locking up your data

29 June 2017 - 11:22 PM

The latest Windows 10 build, today's 16232, contains a few new security features. In addition to the richer control over exploit mitigation that Microsoft announced earlier this week, the new build also includes a trial of a new anti-ransomware capability.

The long-standing approach that operating systems have used to protect files is a mix of file ownership and permissions. On multi-user systems, this is broadly effective: it stops one user from reading or altering files owned by other users of the same system. The long-standing approach is also reasonably effective at protecting the operating system itself from users. But the rise of ransomware has changed the threats to data. The risk with ransomware comes not with another user changing all your files (by encrypting them); rather, the danger is that a program operating under a given user's identity will modify all the data files accessible to that user identity.

In other words, if you can read and write your own documents, so can any ransomware that you run.

Microsoft's attempt to combat this is called "Controlled folder access," and it's part of Windows Defender. With Controlled folder access, certain directories can be designated as being "protected," with certain locations, such as Documents, being compulsorily protected. Protected folders can only be accessed by apps on a whitelist; in theory, any attempt to access a Protected folder will be blocked by Defender. To reduce the maintenance overhead, certain applications will be whitelisted automatically. Microsoft doesn't exactly specify which applications, but we imagine that apps from the Store would automatically be allowed access, for example.

In principle, this should impede the ability of ransomware to encrypt user data. In practice, we'll have to see just how robust Controlled folder access is. To be effective, such a safeguard would need, for example, to prevent malicious Word macros from accessing a Protected folder, even though Word itself should be allowed to read and write to the Documents directory. If ransomware can readily get a trusted application to do its dirty work for it, the protection will likely be circumvented sooner rather than later.

Read full article @ https://arstechnica....bat-ransomware/